Around Analogies

Through its title Around Analogies, the exhibition alludes to the complex associations that are connected to the term analogy. With its exhibits, sound installations, artistic archives and literary works by fellows from various disciplines such as music, fine arts, design, and literature, the group exhibition seeks to explore the question if analogy can be seen as artistic practice – as a method to approach certain forms and contents to appropriate and transfer these.

Considering the rhetoric-philosophic context, analogy serves as the base for simile, metaphor or allegory. In working as an instrument to make something new respectively unknown, describable and tangible – in reference to already existing knowledge – analogy produces continuity as well as difference. In the case of artistic practice, analogy is not to be understood in the sense of appropriation, which consciously cites the recognizable: it is not the source, but the process of the work’s genesis, as transcription or musical adaption of texts as well as the usage of analogy within one’s own work, that constitutes the main interest. Some works also touch on the discourse of these reciprocal relations between original and replica, and thus too deal with the question of authorship.

In the exhibition’s context, analogy additionally appears in another way: as the opposite of the digital. A shared characteristic of the works is the playful contact with and the interlocking of analog and digital devices within a work. Thereby fascinating qualities emerge for the observer, which develop their full appeal and are made comprehendible only through the actual exhibition. In this way, they also open up to discourses in other fields of media and cultural theory, primarily to the essay Das Kunstwerk im Zeitalter seiner technischen Reproduzierbarkeit by Walter Benjamin.

With works by R. Armstrong, Alicja Bielawska, Dan Boehl, Maja Marković, Márió Z. Nemes & Márk Fridvalszki & Zsolt Miklósvölgyi, Louis-Philippe Scoufaras, and Franck C. Yeznikian. Curated by Claudia Gehre.


Line on a Walk
Alicja Bielawska

There are days when sheets of paper pile up on the desk, and crayons and pencils lay scattered like pick-up sticks. Strewn coloured paper cuttings combine serendipitously to resemble geometric exercises based on different vantage points. I move through these planes of colour, set at labyrinthine angles. There are also days with only an empty sheet of paper and a pencil on the desk. Then the mathematical diagrams plunge softly into the gently multiplying matter of thickening space.

Drawing consists of joining invisible dots, reference points for potential, unlimited, unknown constellations. The two dimensional sheet can be expanded to include a number of other dimensions, whilst lines, running from one point to another, can reach new ones. These lines are like sentences that – resulting from one another – constitute their own grammar. As they intersect and turn, they follow an inner logic. When intertwining and interlocking, they form vibrating surfaces and constructions. Their palette ranges from blue and green through red, turquoise, yellow, and grey.

(from the book Disordered Structures by Alicja Bielawska)